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[koh-kot, kuh-; French kaw-kawt] /koʊˈkɒt, kə-; French kɔˈkɔt/
noun, plural cocottes
[koh-kots; French kaw-kawt] /koʊˈkɒts; French kɔˈkɔt/ (Show IPA)
Origin of cocotte1
1865-70; < French: originally a child's word for a hen, equivalent to coq cock1 + -otte feminine suffix


[koh-kot, kuh-; French kaw-kawt] /koʊˈkɒt, kə-; French kɔˈkɔt/
noun, plural cocottes
[koh-kots; French kaw-kawt] /koʊˈkɒts; French kɔˈkɔt/ (Show IPA)
a round or oval casserole, usually of earthenware or fireproof porcelain, used especially for cooking an individual portion of meat, fowl, or game.
1865-70; < French: small cast-iron pot for stewing meat; alteration, by suffix substitution, of Middle French cocasse, coquasse applied to various receptacles, obscurely akin to coquemar kettle, by uncertain mediation < Medieval Greek koukoumárion (or its presumed VL source), ultimately derivative of Latin cucuma kettle Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for cocotte
Historical Examples
  • Remove three dozen Little Neck clams from their shells and put in an earthern casserole or cocotte dish with two ounces of butter.

  • We are in no hurry to part with cocotte; but money is tempting.'

  • "A cocotte has no nationality," the giant contradicted, solemnly.

    Sylvia & Michael Compton Mackenzie
  • That is very little; besides, I do not know that I shall part with cocotte at all.'

  • Deep down, I have not got over my firm resolution of breaking with her, but I could not dismiss her like a cocotte.

    L-bas J. K. Huysmans
  • It is very tempting; still, I do not think I can part with cocotte at any price.'

  • Sapho is an overdrawn type of a Parisian cocotte, but there is something true to nature in her.

  • I heard the father with a stick say to Madame Moronval that your mother was a cocotte.

    Jack Alphonse Daudet
  • He had got it from a cocotte down on her luck, who was in a hurry to dispose of it.

    The Revolt of the Angels Anatole France
  • They chafed and bantered and stormed every caf and cocotte impartially, recklessly.

    Gladiator Philip Wylie
British Dictionary definitions for cocotte


/kəʊˈkɒt; kə-; French kɔkɔt/
a small fireproof dish in which individual portions of food are cooked and served
a prostitute or promiscuous woman
Word Origin
C19: from French, from nursery word for a hen, feminine of coqcock1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cocotte

type of cooking vessel, 1907, from French cocotte "saucepan" (19c.), a diminutive from cocasse, ultimately from Latin cucama. Sense of "prostitute," 1867, is from French cocotte, originally a child's name for "little hen" (18c.), hence "sweetie, darling."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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