coercive

[koh-ur-siv]
adjective
serving or tending to coerce.

Origin:
1590–1600; coerce + -ive

coercively, adverb
coerciveness, noun
noncoercive, adjective
noncoercively, adverb
noncoerciveness, noun
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World English Dictionary
coercion (kəʊˈɜːʃən)
 
n
1.  the act or power of coercing
2.  government by force
 
co'ercionist
 
n
 
coercive
 
adj
 
co'ercively
 
adv
 
co'erciveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

coercive
c.1600, from coerce by infl. of conversive, etc. Form coercitive (attested from 1630s) is more true to Latin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But there are also more coercive measures reportedly under consideration.
Using the coercive power of the state will not help the medically needy find
  efficient and effective care.
The drawback of such plans is that they often seem coercive.
It is alleged that they were hounded to their deaths by lenders' coercive
  recovery practices.
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