colleague

[kol-eeg]
noun
an associate.

Origin:
1515–25; < Middle French collegue < Latin collēga, equivalent to col- col-1 + -lēga, derivative of legere to choose, gather

colleagueship, noun
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World English Dictionary
colleague (ˈkɒliːɡ)
 
n
a fellow worker or member of a staff, department, profession, etc
 
[C16: from French collègue, from Latin collēga one selected at the same time as another, from com- together + lēgāre to choose]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

colleague
1533, from M.Fr. collègue, from L. collega "partner in office," from com- "with" + leg-, stem of legare "to choose." So, "one chosen to work with another."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
There is a patent for linking from one page to another that my colleague has.
In the ethical version a lawyer helps his colleague, whereas in the unethical
  version the lawyer sabotages him.
So they stationed a colleague on a college campus and had her sneeze loudly as
  students walked by.
He and a colleague arrived at the boat within minutes.
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