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13 Essential Literary Terms

colour

[kuhl-er] /ˈkʌl ər/
noun, adjective, verb (used with object), verb (used without object), Chiefly British
1.
Related forms
transcolour, adjective
Usage note
See -or1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for coloured
  • This required each copy to be individually coloured and produced plate by plate.
  • There are few coloured oil drops, which would reduce the light intensity.
  • Their soft plumage is cryptically coloured to resemble bark or leaves.
  • Forms with strikingly coloured, large leaves are grown as ornamentals.
  • Many of these became ancestors of the first cape coloured communities.
  • Tapestry cartoons, usually coloured, were followed by eye by the weavers on the loom.
  • Chameleons are naturally coloured for their surroundings as a camouflage.
  • The handles are coloured to differentiate the rocks belonging to each team.
British Dictionary definitions for coloured

coloured

/ˈkʌləd/
adjective
1.
possessing colour
2.
having a strong element of fiction or fantasy; distorted (esp in the phrase highly coloured)

Coloured

/ˈkʌləd/
noun (pl) Coloureds, Coloured
1.
(old-fashioned, offensive) an individual who is not a White person, esp a Black person
2.
(South African)
  1. a person of mixed ethnic parentage or descent
  2. a person of mixed ethnic descent speaking English or Afrikaans as their mother tongue
adjective
3.
(old-fashioned, offensive) designating or relating to a Coloured person or Coloured people
Usage note
The use of Coloured to refer to a person of mixed ethnic origin is likely to cause offence and should be avoided

colour

/ˈkʌlə/
noun
1.
  1. an attribute of things that results from the light they reflect, transmit, or emit in so far as this light causes a visual sensation that depends on its wavelengths
  2. the aspect of visual perception by which an observer recognizes this attribute
  3. the quality of the light producing this aspect of visual perception
  4. (as modifier): colour vision
2.
Also called chromatic colour
  1. a colour, such as red or green, that possesses hue, as opposed to achromatic colours such as white or black
  2. (as modifier): a colour television, a colour film Compare black-and-white (sense 2)
3.
a substance, such as a dye, pigment, or paint, that imparts colour to something
4.
  1. the skin complexion of a person, esp as determined by his race
  2. (as modifier): colour prejudice, colour problem
5.
the use of all the hues in painting as distinct from composition, form, and light and shade
6.
the quantity and quality of ink used in a printing process
7.
the distinctive tone of a musical sound; timbre
8.
vividness, authenticity, or individuality: period colour
9.
semblance or pretext (esp in the phrases take on a different colour, under colour of)
10.
(US) a precious mineral particle, esp gold, found in auriferous gravel
11.
(physics) one of three characteristics of quarks, designated red, blue, or green, but having no relationship with the physical sensation
verb
12.
to give or apply colour to (something)
13.
(transitive) to give a convincing or plausible appearance to (something, esp to that which is spoken or recounted): to colour an alibi
14.
(transitive) to influence or distort (something, esp a report or opinion): anger coloured her judgment
15.
(intransitive) often foll by up. to become red in the face, esp when embarrassed or annoyed
16.
(intransitive) (esp of ripening fruit) to change hue
See also colours
Word Origin
C13: from Old French colour from Latin color tint, hue
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for coloured

colour

chiefly British English spelling of color (q.v.); for ending see -or. Related: Coloured; colouring; colourful; colours.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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coloured in the Bible

The subject of colours holds an important place in the Scriptures. White occurs as the translation of various Hebrew words. It is applied to milk (Gen. 49:12), manna (Ex. 16:31), snow (Isa. 1:18), horses (Zech. 1:8), raiment (Eccl. 9:8). Another Hebrew word so rendered is applied to marble (Esther 1:6), and a cognate word to the lily (Cant. 2:16). A different term, meaning "dazzling," is applied to the countenance (Cant. 5:10). This colour was an emblem of purity and innocence (Mark 16:5; John 20:12; Rev. 19:8, 14), of joy (Eccl. 9:8), and also of victory (Zech. 6:3; Rev. 6:2). The hangings of the tabernacle court (Ex. 27:9; 38:9), the coats, mitres, bonnets, and breeches of the priests (Ex. 39:27,28), and the dress of the high priest on the day of Atonement (Lev. 16:4,32), were white. Black, applied to the hair (Lev. 13:31; Cant. 5:11), the complexion (Cant. 1:5), and to horses (Zech. 6:2,6). The word rendered "brown" in Gen. 30:32 (R.V., "black") means properly "scorched", i.e., the colour produced by the influence of the sun's rays. "Black" in Job 30:30 means dirty, blackened by sorrow and disease. The word is applied to a mourner's robes (Jer. 8:21; 14:2), to a clouded sky (1 Kings 18:45), to night (Micah 3:6; Jer. 4:28), and to a brook rendered turbid by melted snow (Job 6:16). It is used as symbolical of evil in Zech. 6:2, 6 and Rev. 6:5. It was the emblem of mourning, affliction, calamity (Jer. 14:2; Lam. 4:8; 5:10). Red, applied to blood (2 Kings 3;22), a heifer (Num. 19:2), pottage of lentils (Gen. 25:30), a horse (Zech. 1:8), wine (Prov. 23:31), the complexion (Gen. 25:25; Cant. 5:10). This colour is symbolical of bloodshed (Zech. 6:2; Rev. 6:4; 12:3). Purple, a colour obtained from the secretion of a species of shell-fish (the Murex trunculus) which was found in the Mediterranean, and particularly on the coasts of Phoenicia and Asia Minor. The colouring matter in each separate shell-fish amounted to only a single drop, and hence the great value of this dye. Robes of this colour were worn by kings (Judg. 8:26) and high officers (Esther 8:15). They were also worn by the wealthy and luxurious (Jer. 10:9; Ezek. 27:7; Luke 16:19; Rev. 17:4). With this colour was associated the idea of royalty and majesty (Judg. 8:26; Cant. 3:10; 7:5; Dan. 5:7, 16,29). Blue. This colour was also procured from a species of shell-fish, the chelzon of the Hebrews, and the Helix ianthina of modern naturalists. The tint was emblematic of the sky, the deep dark hue of the Eastern sky. This colour was used in the same way as purple. The ribbon and fringe of the Hebrew dress were of this colour (Num. 15:38). The loops of the curtains (Ex. 26:4), the lace of the high priest's breastplate, the robe of the ephod, and the lace on his mitre, were blue (Ex. 28:28, 31, 37). Scarlet, or Crimson. In Isa. 1:18 a Hebrew word is used which denotes the worm or grub whence this dye was procured. In Gen. 38:28,30, the word so rendered means "to shine," and expresses the brilliancy of the colour. The small parasitic insects from which this dye was obtained somewhat resembled the cochineal which is found in Eastern countries. It is called by naturalists Coccus ilics. The dye was procured from the female grub alone. The only natural object to which this colour is applied in Scripture is the lips, which are likened to a scarlet thread (Cant. 4:3). Scarlet robes were worn by the rich and luxurious (2 Sam. 1:24; Prov. 31:21; Jer. 4:30. Rev. 17:4). It was also the hue of the warrior's dress (Nah. 2:3; Isa. 9:5). The Phoenicians excelled in the art of dyeing this colour (2 Chr. 2:7). These four colours--white, purple, blue, and scarlet--were used in the textures of the tabernacle curtains (Ex. 26:1, 31, 36), and also in the high priest's ephod, girdle, and breastplate (Ex. 28:5, 6, 8, 15). Scarlet thread is mentioned in connection with the rites of cleansing the leper (Lev. 14:4, 6, 51) and of burning the red heifer (Num. 19:6). It was a crimson thread that Rahab was to bind on her window as a sign that she was to be saved alive (Josh. 2:18; 6:25) when the city of Jericho was taken. Vermilion, the red sulphuret of mercury, or cinnabar; a colour used for drawing the figures of idols on the walls of temples (Ezek. 23:14), or for decorating the walls and beams of houses (Jer. 22:14).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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11
14
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