combat

[v. kuhm-bat, kom-bat, kuhm-; n. kom-bat, kuhm-]
verb (used with object), combated, combating or (especially British) combatted, combatting.
1.
to fight or contend against; oppose vigorously: to combat crime.
verb (used without object), combated, combating or (especially British) combatted, combatting.
2.
to battle; contend: to combat with disease.
noun
3.
Military. active, armed fighting with enemy forces.
4.
a fight, struggle, or controversy, as between two persons, teams, or ideas.

Origin:
1535–45; < Middle French combat (noun), combattre (v.) < Late Latin combattere, equivalent to Latin com- com- + Late Latin battere, for Latin battuere to strike, beat

combatable, adjective
intercombat, noun
precombat, noun, verb, precombated, precombating or (especially British) precombatted, precombatting.
self-combating, adjective
uncombatable, adjective
uncombated, adjective


1, 2. struggle, contest.
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World English Dictionary
combat
 
n
1.  a fight, conflict, or struggle
2.  a.  an action fought between two military forces
 b.  (as modifier): a combat jacket
3.  single combat a fight between two individuals; duel
4.  close combat, hand-to-hand combat fighting at close quarters
 
vb , -bats, -bating, -bated
5.  (tr) to fight or defy
6.  (intr; often foll by with or against) to struggle or strive (against); be in conflict (with): to combat against disease
 
[C16: from French, from Old French combattre, from Vulgar Latin combattere (unattested), from Latin com- with + battuere to beat, hit]
 
com'batable
 
adj
 
com'bater
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

combat
1489 (implied in combatant), from M.Fr. combattre, from L.L. combattere, from L. com- "with" (each other) + battuere "to beat, fight" (see batter (v.)). The noun is first recorded 1567.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Two dropped out because of combat wounds that required attention.
The first unmanned combat aircraft is about to take to the skies.
Serving in a war carries with it the possibility of being wounded or dying in
  combat.
It is employed today to combat phobias, control bad habits and enhance
  performance.
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