commendam

[kuh-men-dam]
noun Ecclesiastical.
1.
the tenure of a benefice to be held until the appointment of a regular incumbent, the benefice being said to be held in commendam.
2.
a benefice so held.

Origin:
1555–65; < Medieval Latin, short for (dare) in commendam (to give) in trust; commendam, accusative singular of commenda, noun derivative of Latin commendāre to commend

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commendam (kəˈmɛndæm)
 
n
1.  the temporary holding of an ecclesiastical benefice
2.  a benefice so held
 
[C16: from Medieval Latin phrase dare in commendam to give in trust, from commenda trust, back formation from Latin commendāre to entrust, commend]

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Example sentences
Restrictions on the partner in commendam with regard to management or administration of the partnership.
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