commensal

[kuh-men-suhl]
adjective
1.
eating together at the same table.
2.
Ecology. (of an animal, plant, fungus, etc.) living with, on, or in another, without injury to either.
3.
Sociology. (of a person or group) not competing while residing in or occupying the same area as another individual or group having independent or different values or customs.
noun
4.
a companion at table.
5.
Ecology. a commensal organism.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin commēnsālis. See com-, mensal2

commensalism, noun
commensality [kom-en-sal-i-tee] , noun
commensally, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
commensal (kəˈmɛnsəl)
 
adj
1.  (of two different species of plant or animal) living in close association, such that one species benefits without harming the other
2.  rare of or relating to eating together, esp at the same table: commensal pleasures
 
n
3.  a commensal plant or animal
4.  rare a companion at table
 
[C14: from Medieval Latin commensālis, from Latin com- together + mensa table]
 
com'mensalism
 
n
 
commensality
 
n
 
com'mensally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

commensal
"one who eats at the same table," c.1400, from O.Fr. commensal, from M.L. commensalis, from com- "together" + mensa (gen. mensalis) "table." Biological sense attested from 1870.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

commensal com·men·sal (kə-měn'səl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by a symbiotic relationship in which one species is benefited while the other is unaffected. n.
An organism participating in a symbiotic relationship in which one species derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Then the fish moved further out of the depth of the anemone to examine the commensal shrimp.
The bacteria themselves evolved to favor commensal, and symbiotic relationships.
Resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria can arise through initial selection of resistant strains in the commensal flora.
There would appear to be a natural commensal relationship between the concept of a solar voltaic powered boat and a sail boat.
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