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commensurate

[kuh-men-ser-it, -sher-] /kəˈmɛn sər ɪt, -ʃər-/
adjective
1.
having the same measure; of equal extent or duration.
2.
corresponding in amount, magnitude, or degree:
Your paycheck should be commensurate with the amount of time worked.
3.
proportionate; adequate.
4.
having a common measure; commensurable.
Origin
1635-1645
1635-45; < Late Latin commēnsūrātus, equivalent to Latin com- com- + mēnsūrātus (past participle of mēnsūrāre to measure); see -ate1
Related forms
commensurately, adverb
commensurateness, noun
commensuration
[kuh-men-suh-rey-shuh n, -shuh-] /kəˌmɛn səˈreɪ ʃən, -ʃə-/ (Show IPA),
noun
uncommensurate, adjective
uncommensurately, adverb
Can be confused
commensurate, commiserate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for commensurate
  • Pay will be commensurate with experience and ability.
  • Our camera eyes have to vibrate at a speed commensurate with the speed of the emission.
  • It's an extremely volatile stock that doesn't deliver returns commensurate with the heartache it creates.
  • Authority and power are here commensurate with the duty imposed.
  • Starting salary is commensurate with qualifications.
  • Starting salary is commensurate with educational qualifications and experience.
  • Salary will be commensurate with experience and is negotiable.
  • Salary will be commensurate with the candidate's qualifications.
  • Commencing salaries will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
  • The salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.
British Dictionary definitions for commensurate

commensurate

/kəˈmɛnsərɪt; -ʃə-/
adjective
1.
having the same extent or duration
2.
corresponding in degree, amount, or size; proportionate
3.
able to be measured by a common standard; commensurable
Derived Forms
commensurately, adverb
commensurateness, noun
commensuration (kəˌmɛnsəˈreɪʃən; -ʃə-) noun
Word Origin
C17: from Late Latin commēnsūrātus, from Latin com- same + mēnsurāre to measure
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for commensurate
adj.

1640s, from Late Latin commensuratus, from Latin com- "with" (see com-) + Late Latin mensuratus, past participle of mensurare "to measure," from mensura (see measure (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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