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[kon-kokt, kuh n-] /kɒnˈkɒkt, kən-/
verb (used with object)
to prepare or make by combining ingredients, especially in cookery:
to concoct a meal from leftovers.
to devise; make up; contrive:
to concoct an excuse.
Origin of concoct
1525-35; < Latin concoctus (past participle of concoquere to cook together), equivalent to con- con- + coc-, variant stem of coquere to boil, cook1 (akin to Greek péptein; see pepsin, peptic) + -tus past participle ending
Related forms
concocter, concoctor, noun
concoctive, adjective
well-concocted, adjective
2. invent, fabricate, hatch. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for concocted
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Several merchant-vessels were captured by the Confederates, who concocted the most ingenious plans to secure success.

  • It is the most precious poison that ever was concocted in this world.

  • She had a clever scheme, concocted by herself and Mary Lou while they mingled their tears over this recital of self-sacrifice.

    The Sheriff of Badger George B. Pattullo
  • The idea had come to him that Paliser had concocted the admission.

    The Paliser case Edgar Saltus
  • Then she went back to her room, put on her stays, and concocted some story for the benefit of Quenu, who was still drowsy.

British Dictionary definitions for concocted


verb (transitive)
to make by combining different ingredients
to invent; make up; contrive
Derived Forms
concocter, concoctor, noun
concoctive, adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Latin concoctus cooked together, from concoquere, from coquere to cook
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for concocted



1530s, "to digest," from Latin concoctus, past participle of concoquere "to digest; to boil together, prepare; to consider well," from com- "together" (see com-) + coquere "to cook" (see cook (n.)). Meaning "to prepare an edible thing" is from 1670s. First expanded metaphorically beyond cooking 1792. Related: Concocted; concocting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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