concomitant

[kon-kom-i-tuhnt, kuhn-]
adjective
1.
existing or occurring with something else, often in a lesser way; accompanying; concurrent: an event and its concomitant circumstances.
noun
2.
a concomitant quality, circumstance, or thing.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin concomitant- (stem of concomitāns, present participle of concomitārī), equivalent to con- con- + comit- (stem of comes) comes + -ant- -ant

concomitantly, adverb


1. associated.
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World English Dictionary
concomitant (kənˈkɒmɪtənt)
 
adj
1.  existing or occurring together; associative
 
n
2.  a concomitant act, person, etc
 
[C17: from Late Latin concomitārī to accompany, from com- with + comes companion, fellow]
 
con'comitantly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

concomitant
1607, from Fr. concomitant, from L. concomitantem, prp. of concomitari "accompany, attend," from com- "with, together" + comitari "join as a companion," from comes (gen. comitis) "companion."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
And there are powerful reasons for seeking to avoid the destruction of
  wilderness and the concomitant extinction of species.
Within the redevelopment area, many businesses are struggling with falling
  sales concomitant with a district in decline.
Resignations from public life, and the concomitant loss of salary and
  privileges, are extremely rare.
Thus the parlous state of modeling and the concomitant need for modesty among
  those addicted to central planning.
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