condemnation

[kon-dem-ney-shuhn, -duhm-]

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English condempnacioun (< Middle French) < Late Latin condemnātiōn- (stem of condemnātiō). See condemn, -ation

noncondemnation, noun
recondemnation, noun
self-condemnation, noun
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World English Dictionary
condemn (kənˈdɛm)
 
vb
1.  to express strong disapproval of; censure
2.  to pronounce judicial sentence on
3.  to demonstrate the guilt of: his secretive behaviour condemned him
4.  to judge or pronounce unfit for use: that food has been condemned
5.  to compel or force into a particular state or activity: his disposition condemned him to boredom
 
[C13: from Old French condempner, from Latin condemnāre, from damnāre to condemn; see damn]
 
condemnable
 
adj
 
con'demnably
 
adv
 
condem'nation
 
n
 
con'demner
 
n
 
con'demningly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

condemnation
late 14c., from L. condemnationem, noun of action from condemnare (see condemn).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Thus, much that is worthy of condemnation today was once the product of
  unthinking custom and practice.
Four days since your post yet no hysterical condemnation.
Condemnation cripples, limiting courage to further extend the abilities.
Amazing the scope of such a sweeping condemnation of the disciplines of the
  biological sciences.
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