conditional

[kuhn-dish-uh-nl]
adjective
1.
imposing, containing, subject to, or depending on a condition or conditions; not absolute; made or allowed on certain terms: conditional acceptance.
2.
Grammar. (of a sentence, clause, mood, or word) involving or expressing a condition, as the first clause in the sentence If it rains, he won't go.
3.
Logic.
a.
(of a proposition) asserting that the existence or occurrence of one thing or event depends on the existence or occurrence of another thing or event; hypothetical.
b.
(of a syllogism) containing at least one conditional proposition as a premise.
4.
Mathematics. (of an inequality) true for only certain values of the variable, as x + 3 > 0 is only true for real numbers greater than −3. Compare absolute ( def 12 ).
noun
5.
Grammar.
a.
(in some languages) a mood, tense, or other category used in expressing conditions, often corresponding to an English verb phrase beginning with would, as Spanish comería “he would eat.”
b.
a sentence, clause, or word expressing a condition.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English condicionel < Anglo-French, Middle French < Late Latin condiciōnālis, equivalent to condiciōn- (stem of condiciō) condition + -ālis -al1

conditionality, noun
conditionally, adverb
nonconditional, adjective


1. dependent, contingent, relative.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
conditional (kənˈdɪʃənəl)
 
adj
1.  depending on other factors; not certain
2.  grammar (of a clause, conjunction, form of a verb, or whole sentence) expressing a condition on which something else is contingent: "If he comes" is a conditional clause in the sentence "If he comes I shall go"
3.  a.  (of an equation or inequality) true for only certain values of the variable: x² --1 = x + 1 is a conditional equation, only true for x = 2 or --1
 b.  (of an infinite series) divergent when the absolute values of the terms are considered
4.  logic Also: hypothetical (of a proposition) consisting of two component propositions associated by the words if…then so that the proposition is false only when the antecedent is true and the consequent false. Usually written: pq or pq, where p is the antecedent, q the consequent, and → or ⊃ symbolizes implies
 
n
5.  grammar
 a.  a conditional form of a verb
 b.  a conditional clause or sentence
6.  logic a conditional proposition
 
condition'ality
 
n
 
con'ditionally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

conditional
late 14c., condicionel, from O.Fr. condicionel (Mod.Fr. conditionnel), from L. conditionalem, from condicere (see condition).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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