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condonation

[kon-doh-ney-shuh n] /ˌkɒn doʊˈneɪ ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of condoning; the overlooking or implied forgiving of an offense.
Also, condonance
[kuh n-doh-nuh ns] /kənˈdoʊ nəns/ (Show IPA)
.
Origin
1615-1625
1615-25; < Neo-Latin condōnātiōn- (stem of condōnātiō), Latin: a giving away, equivalent to condōnāt(us) (past participle of condōnāre; see condone) + -iōn- -ion. See con-, donation
Related forms
noncondonation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for condonation
  • It means actual condonation of counsel's alleged offense, coupled with verbal disapprobation.
  • Cohabitation after marital misconduct is evidence of condonation but standing alone is not conclusive.
  • The majority appears to liken the reconciliation to condonation as a defense in a divorce action.
  • condonation is the forgiveness of a marital offense.
  • It means actual condonation of counsel's alleged offense, coupled with verbal disapprobation.
  • To suggest that the instruction prompts condonation of such conduct underestimates jurors' intelligence.
  • Repeated warnings over a long period of time are the opposite of condonation.
  • Pervasive noncompliance may indicate systemic or repeated participation in or condonation of criminal behavior.
Word Origin and History for condonation
n.

1620s, from Latin condonationem (nominative condonatio) "a giving away," noun of action from condonare (see condone).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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