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conducive

[kuh n-doo-siv, -dyoo-] /kənˈdu sɪv, -ˈdyu-/
adjective
1.
tending to produce; contributive; helpful; favorable (usually followed by to):
Good eating habits are conducive to good health.
Origin of conducive
1640-1650
1640-50; conduce + -ive
Related forms
conduciveness, noun
nonconducive, adjective
nonconduciveness, noun
unconducive, adjective
unconducively, adverb
unconduciveness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for conducive
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Also, a Treatise of Witches in general, conducive to mirth and recreation.

    Lancashire Folk-lore John Harland
  • What they had to consider was what course would be most conducive to the interests of Athens.

  • But the life I lead, Miss Manette, is not conducive to health.

    A Tale of Two Cities Charles Dickens
  • "Amateur" biscuits are not conducive to good digestion or happiness.

    Boy Scouts Handbook Boy Scouts of America
  • I can bring myself to say whatever may be best for him, and most conducive to his wishes.

    An Old Man's Love Anthony Trollope
British Dictionary definitions for conducive

conducive

/kənˈdjuːsɪv/
adjective
1.
when postpositive, foll by to. contributing, leading, or tending
Derived Forms
conduciveness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for conducive
adj.

1640s, from conduce + -ive.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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