coney

[koh-nee, kuhn-ee]
noun, plural coneys.
1.
a serranid fish, Epinephelus fulvus, of tropical American waters.
2.

Origin:
spelling variant of cony

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
coney (ˈkəʊnɪ)
 
n
a variant spelling of cony

cony or coney (ˈkəʊnɪ)
 
n , pl -nies, -neys
1.  a rabbit or fur made from the skin of a rabbit
2.  (in the Bible) another name for the hyrax, esp the Syrian rock hyrax
3.  another name for pika
4.  archaic a fool or dupe
 
[C13: back formation from conies, from Old French conis, plural of conil, from Latin cunīculus rabbit]
 
coney or coney
 
n
 
[C13: back formation from conies, from Old French conis, plural of conil, from Latin cunīculus rabbit]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

coney
c.1200, from Anglo-Norm. conis, pl. of conil "long-eared rabbit" (Lepus cunicula) from L. cuniculus (cf. Sp. conejo, Port. coelho, It. coneglio), the small, Spanish variant of the It. hare (L. lepus), the word perhaps from Iberian Celtic (classical writers say it is Spanish).
Rabbit arose 14c. to mean the young of the species, but gradually pushed out the older word 19c., after British slang picked up coney as a synonym for "cunt" (cf. connyfogle "to deceive in order to win a woman's sexual favors"). The word was in the King James Bible [Prov. xxx.26, etc.], however, so it couldn't be entirely dropped, and the solution was to change the pronunciation of the original short vowel (rhyming with honey, money) to rhyme with boney. In the O.T., the word translates Heb. shaphan "rock-badger." Rabbits not being native to northern Europe, there was no Gmc. or Celtic word for them. Brooklyn's Coney Island so called for the rabbits once found there and was known to the Du. as Konijn Eiland, from which the Eng. name probably derives.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Coney definition


(Heb. shaphan; i.e., "the hider"), an animal which inhabits the mountain gorges and the rocky districts of Arabia Petraea and the Holy Land. "The conies are but a feeble folk, yet make they their houses in the rocks" (Prov. 30:26; Ps. 104:18). They are gregarious, and "exceeding wise" (Prov. 30:24), and are described as chewing the cud (Lev. 11:5; Deut. 14:7). The animal intended by this name is known among naturalists as the Hyrax Syriacus. It is neither a ruminant nor a rodent, but is regarded as akin to the rhinoceros. When it is said to "chew the cud," the Hebrew word so used does not necessarily imply the possession of a ruminant stomach. "The lawgiver speaks according to appearances; and no one can watch the constant motion of the little creature's jaws, as it sits continually working its teeth, without recognizing the naturalness of the expression" (Tristram, Natural History of the Bible). It is about the size and color of a rabbit, though clumsier in structure, and without a tail. Its feet are not formed for digging, and therefore it has its home not in burrows but in the clefts of the rocks. "Coney" is an obsolete English word for "rabbit."

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Coney said there is a need for more pedestrian refuge.
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