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confide

[kuh n-fahyd] /kənˈfaɪd/
verb (used without object), confided, confiding.
1.
to impart secrets trustfully; discuss private matters or problems (usually followed by in):
She confides in no one but her husband.
2.
to have full trust; have faith:
They confided in their own ability.
verb (used with object), confided, confiding.
3.
to tell in assurance of secrecy:
He confided all his plans to her.
4.
to entrust; commit to the charge or knowledge of another:
She confided her jewelry to her sister.
Origin
1625-1635
1625-35; < Latin confīdere, equivalent to con- con- + fīdere to trust, akin to foedus; see confederate, fidelity
Related forms
confider, noun
preconfide, verb, preconfided, preconfiding.
unconfided, adjective
well-confided, adjective
Synonyms
3. disclose, reveal, divulge, impart.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for confide
  • It is due to the sound discretion with which they select from among themselves those to whom they confide the legislative duties.
  • He tries to confide in his family but they rebuke him for questioning his faith.
  • The clinic's people work on the theory that many do seek someone in whom to confide, simply to talk.
  • Gaining it, she thought, he would confide in her--he would eventually speak.
  • The idea is that a criminal might not confide in a lawyer if his crimes could someday become public.
  • Work with someone in whom you can confide your lurking fears about weight and body image.
  • Perhaps as a consequence, he sometimes did not confide in her.
  • Two people dressed in purple confide their thoughts to one another.
  • They don't ask you to reveal yourself or confide your secrets.
  • They gaze ardently into each other's eyes, confide dark secrets, embrace by rubbing cheek to cheek.
British Dictionary definitions for confide

confide

/kənˈfaɪd/
verb
1.
usually foll by in; when tr, may take a clause as object. to disclose (secret or personal matters) in confidence (to); reveal in private (to)
2.
(intransitive) foll by in. to have complete trust
3.
(transitive) to entrust into another's keeping
Derived Forms
confider, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin confīdere, from fīdere to trust; related to Latin foedus treaty
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for confide
v.

mid-15c., "to trust or have faith," from Latin confidere "to trust in, rely firmly upon, believe" (see confidence). Meaning "to share a secret with" is from 1735; phrase confide in (someone) is from 1888. Related: Confided; confiding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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