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conflate

[kuh n-fleyt] /kənˈfleɪt/
verb (used with object), conflated, conflating.
1.
to fuse into one entity; merge:
to conflate dissenting voices into one protest.
Origin
1600-1610
1600-10; < Latin conflātus, past participle of conflāre to fuse together, equivalent to con- con- + flāre to blow2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for conflate
  • Stories that conflate behaviors and traits miss all that.
  • The problem is that people conflate these two as if they are identical concepts.
  • Still others would conflate the two, hoping to incorporate the best of both while avoiding their limitations.
  • It is considered a distortion to define or conflate open standards as requiring open source and free software.
  • That's because they conflate mainstream media with printing presses.
  • Do not, in the meantime, conflate volatility with risk.
  • But let's not completely conflate our national self-interest with self-righteous moral judgment.
  • It was an ill considered attempt to conflate the two beatings.
  • Your questions are highly leading and conflate many issues.
  • Please, let's not conflate thermal conductivity and heat capacity.
British Dictionary definitions for conflate

conflate

/kənˈfleɪt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to combine or blend (two things, esp two versions of a text) so as to form a whole
Derived Forms
conflation, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin conflāre to blow together, from flāre to blow
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for conflate
v.

1540s, from Latin conflat-, past participle stem of conflare "to blow up, kindle, light; bring together, compose," also "to melt together," literally "to blow together," from com- "with" (see com-) + flare "to blow" (see blow (v.1)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for conflate

13
16
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