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consent

[kuh n-sent] /kənˈsɛnt/
verb (used without object)
1.
to permit, approve, or agree; comply or yield (often followed by to or an infinitive):
He consented to the proposal. We asked her permission, and she consented.
2.
Archaic. to agree in sentiment, opinion, etc.; be in harmony.
noun
3.
permission, approval, or agreement; compliance; acquiescence:
He gave his consent to the marriage.
4.
agreement in sentiment, opinion, a course of action, etc.:
By common consent he was appointed official delegate.
5.
Archaic. accord; concord; harmony.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; (v.) Middle English consenten < Anglo-French, Old French consentir < Latin consentīre (see consensus); (noun) Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French, noun derivative of the v.
Related forms
consenter, noun
consentingly, adverb
nonconsent, noun
nonconsenting, adjective, noun
preconsent, noun, verb (used without object)
reconsent, verb (used without object)
unconsenting, adjective
Can be confused
ascent, assent, consent.
Synonyms
1. See agree.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for consent
  • consent was obtained from intended recipient and admissions obtained from both shipper and recipient.
  • Secondary use is the exploitation of data obtained for one purpose for an unrelated purpose without the subject's consent.
  • In this case, it seems unfair to punish them for something they did not consent to doing.
  • Their personal business was posted online without their consent with the vast majority of the content being false.
  • Instead, she cheerfully signed the consent form and let me take her blood.
  • We will not share your personally-identifying information with third-party advertisers without your consent.
  • Across medicine the standard for human experimentation is informed consent.
  • It is part of being a knowledgeable consumer and giving informed consent.
  • Nothing may be reproduced in part or in whole without the express written consent of the copyright owner.
  • Requiring a student to, effectively, consent to an idea violates his personal integrity.
British Dictionary definitions for consent

consent

/kənˈsɛnt/
verb
1.
to give assent or permission (to do something); agree; accede
2.
(intransitive) (obsolete) to be in accord; agree in opinion, feelings, etc
noun
3.
acquiescence to or acceptance of something done or planned by another; permission
4.
accordance or harmony in opinion; agreement (esp in the phrase with one consent)
5.
age of consent, the lowest age at which the law recognizes the right of a person to consent to sexual intercourse
Derived Forms
consenter, noun
consenting, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French consentir, from Latin consentīre to feel together, agree, from sentīre to feel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for consent
v.

early 13c., from Old French consentir (12c.) "agree, comply," from Latin consentire "feel together," from com- "with" (see com-) + sentire "to feel" (see sense (n.)). "Feeling together," hence, "agreeing, giving permission," apparently a sense evolution that took place in French before the word reached English. Related: Consented; consenting.

n.

c.1300, "approval," also "agreement in sentiment, harmony," from Old French consente, from consentir (see consent (v.)). Age of consent is attested from 1809.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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