Try Our Apps


Gobble up these 8 terms for eating


[kon-ster-ney-shuh n] /ˌkɒn stərˈneɪ ʃən/
a sudden, alarming amazement or dread that results in utter confusion; dismay.
Origin of consternation
1605-15; < Latin consternātiōn- (stem of consternātiō). See consternate, -ion
bewilderment, alarm, terror, fear, panic, fright, horror.
composure, equanimity. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for consternation
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Great was the consternation of the Abbot when he confronted this awful apparition.

  • The consternation of the Americans it would be hard to imagine.

    A Prisoner of Morro Upton Sinclair
  • By this time the consternation in the enemy's camp was all that the sorceress could desire.

  • The sailors halted and stared at each other in consternation.

    A Prisoner of Morro Upton Sinclair
  • consternation filled me as I heard this terrible accusation.

    The Pilots of Pomona Robert Leighton
British Dictionary definitions for consternation


a feeling of anxiety, dismay, dread, or confusion
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for consternation

1610s, from French consternation "dismay, confusion," from Latin consternationem (nominative consternatio) "confusion, dismay," from consternat-, past participle stem of consternare "overcome, confuse, dismay, perplex, terrify, alarm," probably related to consternere "throw down, prostrate," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + sternere "to spread out" (see stratum).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for consternation

Scrabble Words With Friends