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Supposedly vs. Supposably


[kon-suh b-stan-shuh l] /ˌkɒn səbˈstæn ʃəl/
of one and the same substance, essence, or nature.
Origin of consubstantial
1350-1400; Middle English < Late Latin consubstantiālis, equivalent to con- con- + substanti(a) substance + -ālis -al1
Related forms
consubstantialism, noun
consubstantialist, noun
consubstantiality, noun
consubstantially, adverb Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for consubstantial
Historical Examples
  • Here it may be asked: If soul is manifested only as consubstantial with God, why this laboured effort to exhibit the recognition?

    The Sarva-Darsana-Samgraha Madhava Acharya
  • Is that then the divine substance wherein Father and Son are consubstantial?

    Ulysses James Joyce
  • The Father is the essential principle, and yet He is consubstantial with the other two Persons.

    A Mediaeval Mystic Vincent Scully
  • The sequentiality of writing and the need to express sequences pertinent to conflicts are consubstantial.

  • Evidently they will not be consubstantial with existence, if this existence of theirs be in the future or past.

    Plotinos: Complete Works, v. 3 Plotinos (Plotinus)
  • After his death, the troubles caused by the single word "consubstantial" agitated the empire with renewed violence.

    A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 2 (of 10) Franois-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)
  • Whether he is consubstantial, that is, of the same substance with the Father, or only of a similar substance.

  • It is true also that Scholasticism is not only ministerial to Popery, but in parts is consubstantial with Popery.

  • After much altercation, it was at last decided that the Son was as old as the Father, and consubstantial with the Father.

    A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 3 (of 10) Franois-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire)
  • And though obscured, yet to think myself obscured by consubstantial forms, based in the same foundation as my own.

    Biographia Epistolaris Volume 2 Samuel Taylor Coleridge
British Dictionary definitions for consubstantial


(Christian theol) (esp of the three persons of the Trinity) regarded as identical in substance or essence though different in aspect
Derived Forms
consubstantiality, noun
consubstantially, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Church Latin consubstāntiālis, from Latin com- + substantiasubstance
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for consubstantial

late 15c., a term in the theology of the trinity, from Church Latin consubstantialis, from com- "with" (see com-) + substantia (see substance). In general use from 1570s. Related: Consubstantiality.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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