continuum

[kuhn-tin-yoo-uhm]
noun, plural continua [kuhn-tin-yoo-uh] .
1.
a continuous extent, series, or whole.
2.
Mathematics.
a.
a set of elements such that between any two of them there is a third element.
b.
the set of all real numbers.
c.
any compact, connected set containing at least two elements.

Origin:
1640–50; < Latin, noun use of neuter of continuus continuous

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World English Dictionary
continuum (kənˈtɪnjʊəm)
 
n , pl -tinua, -tinuums
a continuous series or whole, no part of which is perceptibly different from the adjacent parts
 
[C17: from Latin, neuter of continuuscontinuous]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

continuum
1650, from L. neut. of continuus. (see continue). The plural is continua.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
So, you see, the real number continuum is full of holes.
The deficits, in other words, are not all at one end of the continuum.
Not even a single point will move in geometric space as it destroys the
  continuum of the geometric space.
There is a continuum of publicness and persistence and anonymity.
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