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convey

[kuh n-vey] /kənˈveɪ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to carry, bring, or take from one place to another; transport; bear.
2.
to communicate; impart; make known:
to convey a wish.
3.
to lead or conduct, as a channel or medium; transmit.
4.
Law. to transfer; pass the title to.
5.
Archaic. steal; purloin.
6.
Obsolete. to take away secretly.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English conveyen < Anglo-French conveier < Vulgar Latin *conviāre, equivalent to con- con- + -viāre, derivative of via way; see via
Related forms
conveyable, adjective
preconvey, verb (used with object)
quasi-conveyed, adjective
well-conveyed, adjective
Synonyms
1. move. See carry.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for convey
  • Body position, movement, and facial expression often convey a strong message.
  • The point being that a play doesn't necessarily have an obligation to convey a moral, social, or political message.
  • The telegraph always manages to convey the wrong message.
  • We need to create events that convey a message to reinforce our paid message.
  • It does convey the message, but is illogical in some places and constructed poorly.
  • The message they wanted to convey was it was better to eat more of some things than others.
  • The purpose of writing papers is to convey a message.
  • Whether it's right or not, the message the heels convey might not be the message you want the search committee receiving.
  • We distributed thousands of leaflets to convey the message that taking a dip could never ever wash away one's sins.
  • It so happens that my personal reaction was in line with what the designer intended to convey.
British Dictionary definitions for convey

convey

/kənˈveɪ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to take, carry, or transport from one place to another
2.
to communicate (a message, information, etc)
3.
(of a channel, path, etc) to conduct, transmit, or transfer
4.
(law) to transmit or transfer (the title to property)
5.
(archaic) to steal
Derived Forms
conveyable, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French conveier, from Medieval Latin conviāre to escort, from Latin com- with + via way
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for convey
v.

c.1300, "to go along with;" late 14c., "to carry, transport;" from Anglo-French conveier, from Old French convoier "to escort" (Modern French convoyer), from Vulgar Latin *conviare "to accompany on the way," from Latin com- "together" (see com-) + via "way, road" (see via). It was a euphemism for "steal" 15c.-17c., which helped broaden its meaning. Related: Conveyed; conveying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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