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convey

[kuh n-vey] /kənˈveɪ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to carry, bring, or take from one place to another; transport; bear.
2.
to communicate; impart; make known:
to convey a wish.
3.
to lead or conduct, as a channel or medium; transmit.
4.
Law. to transfer; pass the title to.
5.
Archaic. steal; purloin.
6.
Obsolete. to take away secretly.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English conveyen < Anglo-French conveier < Vulgar Latin *conviāre, equivalent to con- con- + -viāre, derivative of via way; see via
Related forms
conveyable, adjective
preconvey, verb (used with object)
quasi-conveyed, adjective
well-conveyed, adjective
Synonyms
1. move. See carry.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for conveys
  • With a few spare shapes, he conveys an instantly recognizable image.
  • Respond to a question that sounds hostile in a way that conveys empathy with the interviewer's concern.
  • They don't seem to understand that a preposition actually conveys information.
  • It is the rare photo that conveys the spirit of music and dance.
  • The tether conveys guidance information from the pilot topside and video images from the deep.
  • Thus the dancer conveys only the direction of the food source and the total amount of image motion that should occur en route.
  • Its likely consciousness is in dendrites, and requires less energy than axonal spiking which conveys behavior.
  • There is no such thing as language that conveys meaning while not simultaneously transmitting its words.
  • The data rendering once again conveys the scale of this event, though this time from a geologic point of view.
  • The pulmonary artery conveys the venous blood from the right ventricle of the heart to the lungs.
British Dictionary definitions for conveys

convey

/kənˈveɪ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to take, carry, or transport from one place to another
2.
to communicate (a message, information, etc)
3.
(of a channel, path, etc) to conduct, transmit, or transfer
4.
(law) to transmit or transfer (the title to property)
5.
(archaic) to steal
Derived Forms
conveyable, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French conveier, from Medieval Latin conviāre to escort, from Latin com- with + via way
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for conveys

convey

v.

c.1300, "to go along with;" late 14c., "to carry, transport;" from Anglo-French conveier, from Old French convoier "to escort" (Modern French convoyer), from Vulgar Latin *conviare "to accompany on the way," from Latin com- "together" (see com-) + via "way, road" (see via). It was a euphemism for "steal" 15c.-17c., which helped broaden its meaning. Related: Conveyed; conveying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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