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copycat

[kop-ee-kat] /ˈkɒp iˌkæt/
noun, Also, copy cat
1.
a person or thing that copies, imitates, mimics, or follows the lead of another, as a child who says or does exactly the same as another child.
adjective
2.
imitating or repeating a recent, well-known occurrence:
a copycat murder.
verb (used with object), copycatted, copycatting.
3.
to imitate or mimic:
new domestic wines that copycat the expensive imports.
4.
to copy slavishly; reproduce:
The clothes were copycatted straight from designer originals.
Origin
1895-1900
1895-1900, Americanism; copy + cat1
Related forms
copycatism, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for copycat
  • Seeing it together with the one of the same color makes it seem more copycat.
  • copycat cereal manufacturers popped up overnight, and the town became the birthplace of the cereal industry.
  • It wasn't long before there were copycat groups operating on the border, intense in-fighting among immigration restrictionists.
  • And the copycat portfolio offered investors many of the same benefits of diversification as the fund it mimicked.
  • Their reticence could reflect fears of copycat crimes, or simply the old habit of suppressing news during big events.
  • Their reticence could reflect fears of copycat crimes, or simply the old habit of burying news during big events.
  • The great mystery about these copycat cars is their price.
  • These copycat entrepreneurs forgot the importance of the concept of demand.
  • The concern is that they might then inspire copycat efforts among similarly deranged individuals.
  • In particular, officials are concerned that a slew of copycat weather balloon launches could pose a risk to commercial aviation.
British Dictionary definitions for copycat

copycat

/ˈkɒpɪˌkæt/
noun
1.
(informal)
  1. a person, esp a child, who imitates or copies another
  2. (as modifier): copycat murders
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for copycat
n.

by 1884, American English, probably at least a generation older, from copy (v.) + cat (n.). As a verb, from 1932.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for copycat

copycat

modifier

: a copycat inventor/ copycat crime

noun
  1. An imitator; mimic •May be forty or fifty years older (1890s+)
  2. A copycat crime or criminal: Could be a copycat. Guy wants to do his wife in, covers it up by making it look like Red Rose/ I knew enough to bet the farm that this was no coincidence or copycat (1960s+)
verb

: Sally traps her there, and copycats the first murder, gore and all (1930s+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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16
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