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cosset

[kos-it] /ˈkɒs ɪt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to treat as a pet; pamper; coddle.
noun
2.
a lamb brought up without its dam; pet lamb.
3.
any pet.
Origin
1570-1580
1570-80; akin to Old English cossetung kissing, verbal noun based on *cossettan to kiss, derivative of coss kiss
Related forms
uncosseted, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for cosseted
  • It is the demand of spoiled children, or the cosseted residents of the imperial city.
  • When it comes to cross-border takeovers, banking has for too long been a cosseted business.
  • Funds are plundered to hire them, and the star himself must be smoothed, cosseted and humoured as long as the run lasts.
  • Reducing protectionist subsidies would cut greenhouse gases from cosseted heavy industry.
  • Another is that public-sector pay and benefits have shot ahead as a cosseted caste extends its privileges.
  • So top billing should go to deregulating cosseted industries and reforming the labour market.
  • Yet one culprit is not only rarely seen as an offender, but is also being cosseted and protected.
  • cosseted industries turned out finished goods that were worth less than the imported materials from which they were made.
  • The situation in the relatively cosseted public sector has been rather different.
  • Farmers cosseted by generous government support or high barriers to imports are keen to preserve the status quo.
British Dictionary definitions for cosseted

cosset

/ˈkɒsɪt/
verb (transitive) -sets, -seting, -seted
1.
to pamper; coddle; pet
noun
2.
any pet animal, esp a lamb
Word Origin
C16: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cosseted

cosset

v.

1650s, "to fondle, caress, indulge," from a noun (1570s) meaning "lamb brought up as a pet" (applied to persons from 1590s), perhaps from Old English cot-sæta "one who dwells in a cot." Related: Coseted; coseting. Cf. German Hauslamm, Italian casiccio.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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