cozy

[koh-zee]
adjective, cozier, coziest.
1.
snugly warm and comfortable: a cozy little house.
2.
convenient or beneficial, usually as a result of dishonesty or connivance: a very cozy agreement between competing firms.
3.
suggesting opportunistic or conspiratorial intimacy: a cozy relationship between lobbyists and some politicians.
4.
discreetly reticent or noncommittal: The administrators are remaining cozy about which policy they plan to adopt.
noun, plural cozies.
5.
a padded covering for a teapot, chocolate pot, etc., to retain the heat.
verb (used with object), cozied, cozying.
6.
to make more cozy (often followed by up ): New curtains would cozy the room up a bit.
Verb phrases
7.
cozy up (to), Informal.
a.
to move closer for comfort or affection: Come over to the fire and cozy up a bit.
b.
to try to become friendly or intimate in order to further one's own ends; attempt to ingratiate oneself: He's always cozying up to the boss.
Also, cosy, cozey, cozie.


Origin:
1700–10; orig. Scots; perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian koselig cozy, kose seg to enjoy oneself

cozily, adverb
coziness, noun


1. snug, comfy, homey, sheltered.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
cosy or cozy (ˈkəʊzɪ)
 
adj , (US) -sier, -siest, -zier, -ziest
1.  warm and snug
2.  intimate; friendly
3.  convenient, esp for devious purposes: a cosy deal
 
n , -sier, -siest, -zier, -ziest, -sies, -zies
4.  a cover for keeping things warm: egg cosy
 
[C18: from Scots, of unknown origin]
 
cozy or cozy
 
adj
 
n
 
[C18: from Scots, of unknown origin]
 
'cosily or cozy
 
adv
 
'cozily or cozy
 
adv
 
'cosiness or cozy
 
n
 
'coziness or cozy
 
n

cozy (ˈkəʊzɪ)
 
adj, —n , pl -zier, -ziest, -zies
the usual US spelling of cosy
 
'cozily
 
adv
 
'coziness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cozy
1709, colsie, Scottish dialect, perhaps of Scand. origin (cf. Norw. kose seg "be cozy"). In Britain, usually cosy.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Then there's the vital warm and cozy hotels to house us here in this wintry town.
At private places there's much less need to cozy up to politicians.
Now, backed by the enveloping curves of a stone-filled wire-mesh wall, this part of the yard feels cozy.
Ideally, you'd experience an ice room for one night, then cozy up in a warm
  room for the rest of your stay.
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