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crick1

[krik] /krɪk/
noun
1.
a sharp, painful spasm of the muscles, as of the neck or back.
verb (used with object)
2.
to give a crick or wrench to (the neck, back, etc.).
Origin of crick1
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English crikke, perhaps akin to crick2

crick2

[krik] /krɪk/
noun, Northern, North Midland, and Western U.S.
1.
creek (def 1).

Crick

[krik] /krɪk/
noun
1.
Francis Harry Compton, 1916–2004, English biophysicist: Nobel Prize in Medicine 1962.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for crick
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • They ketched him at the crick, and took him off along that road that turned off to the left.

    Danny's Own Story Don Marquis
  • "Come down to the crick with me after tea, and I'll explain," said Will.

  • I was on the point of giving up the milking of that cow, and my back got a crick in it every time I split the kindlings.

    A Spoil of Office Hamlin Garland
  • Mr. Moss was disentangling the crick in his back for the last time that day.

    The Law-Breakers Ridgwell Cullum
  • It's from down on the crick bank back of the slaughter-house!

    The Just and the Unjust Vaughan Kester
  • I disremember just how fur that last stop is from the crick, but I think it's betwixt 25 and 30 mile.

  • The crick was of a warm and passionate temperament, and was devotedly attached to the Dust.

    Miscellanea Juliana Horatia Ewing
  • Sounds like somebody slappin' the crick with a fishin'-pole.

  • Then there's always the crick to git trout outen; and in a short time you could shoot pa'tridges without breakin' the game laws.

    At Whispering Pine Lodge Lawrence J. Leslie
British Dictionary definitions for crick

crick1

/krɪk/
noun
1.
a painful muscle spasm or cramp, esp in the neck or back
verb
2.
(transitive) to cause a crick in (the neck, back, etc)
Word Origin
C15: of uncertain origin

crick2

/krɪk/
noun
1.
(US & Canadian) a dialect word for creek (sense 2)

Crick

/krɪk/
noun
1.
Francis Harry Compton. 1916–2004, English molecular biologist: helped to discover the helical structure of DNA; Nobel prize for physiology or medicine shared with James Watson and Maurice Wilkins 1962
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for crick
n.

early 15c., of uncertain origin; OED says "probably onomatopœic."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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crick in Medicine

crick (krĭk)
n.
A painful cramp or muscle spasm, as in the back or neck. v. cricked, crick·ing, cricks
To cause a painful cramp or muscle spasm in by turning or wrenching.

Crick (krĭk), Francis Henry Compton. Born 1916.

British biologist who with James D. Watson proposed a spiral model, the double helix, for the molecular structure of DNA. He shared a 1962 Nobel Prize for advances in the study of genetics.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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crick in Science
Crick
  (krĭk)   
British biologist who with James D. Watson identified the structure of DNA in 1953. By analyzing the patterns cast by x-rays striking DNA molecules, they found that DNA has the structure of a double helix, consisting of two spirals linked together at the base, forming ladderlike rungs. For this work they shared the 1962 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine with Maurice Wilkins.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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13
15
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