crock

1 [krok]

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English crokke, Old English croc(c), crocca pot; cognate with Old Norse krukka jug

Dictionary.com Unabridged

crock

2 [krok]
noun
1.
a person or thing that is old, decrepit, or broken-down.
2.
Slang. a person who complains about or insists on being treated for an imagined illness.
3.
an old ewe.
4.
an old worn-out horse.
verb (used with object)
5.
British Slang. to disable or injure.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English crok old ewe, perhaps akin to crack (v.) and obsolete crack whore; compare Low German krakke broken-down horse

crock

3 [krok]
noun
1.
British Dialect. soot; smut.
2.
excess surface dye from imperfectly dyed cloth.
verb (used with object)
3.
British Dialect. to soil with soot.
verb (used without object)
4.
(of cloth) to give off excess surface dye when rubbed.

Origin:
1650–60; origin uncertain

crock

4 [krok]
noun Slang.
a lie; exaggeration; nonsense: The entire story is just a crock.

Origin:
orig. unclear, though often taken as a euphemism for a crock of shit

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
crock1 (krɒk)
 
n
1.  an earthen pot, jar, etc
2.  a piece of broken earthenware
3.  informal (US), (Canadian) Also: crock of shit a quantity or source of lies or nonsense
 
[Old English crocc pot; related to Old Norse krukka jug, Middle Low German krūke pot]

crock2 (krɒk)
 
n
1.  slang chiefly (Brit) a person or thing, such as a car, that is old or decrepit (esp in the phrase old crock)
2.  an old broken-down horse or ewe
 
vb
3.  slang chiefly (Brit) to become or cause to become weak or disabled
 
[C15: originally Scottish; related to Norwegian krake unhealthy animal, Dutch kraak decrepit person or animal]

crock3 (krɒk)
 
n
1.  dialect chiefly (Brit) soot or smut
2.  colour that rubs off fabric
 
vb
3.  dialect chiefly (Brit) (tr) to soil with or as if with soot
4.  (intr) (of a dyed fabric) to release colour when rubbed, as a result of imperfect dyeing
 
[C17: probably from crock1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

crock
O.E. crocc, crocca "pot," from P.Gmc. *krogu "pitcher, pot." Used as an image of worthless rubbish since 19c., perhaps from the use of crockery as chamberpots.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

crock definition


  1. n.
    nonsense. (From crock (of shit).) : What a crock! You don't know what you are talking about!
  2. n.
    a drunkard. : Give the old crock some money, anything to get him outa here before he barfs or something.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
Cite This Source

crock (of shit) definition


  1. n.
    a mass of lies and deception worth no more than dung. (Usually objectionable.) : That's nothing but a crock of shit! I don't believe a word of it.
  2. n.
    a person who tells lies. (Rude and derogatory.) : He's just a crock of shit. He never tells the truth.
  3. n.
    a braggart. (Rude and derogatory.) : He's such a crock. He makes everything he has done sound ten times better than it really is.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
Cite This Source
FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

crock definition


[American scatologism "crock of shit"] 1. An awkward feature or programming technique that ought to be made cleaner. For example, using small integers to represent error codes without the program interpreting them to the user (as in, for example, Unix "make(1)", which returns code 139 for a process that dies due to segfault).
2. A technique that works acceptably, but which is quite prone to failure if disturbed in the least. For example, a too-clever programmer might write an assembler which mapped instruction mnemonics to numeric opcodes algorithmically, a trick which depends far too intimately on the particular bit patterns of the opcodes. (For another example of programming with a dependence on actual opcode values, see The Story of Mel.) Many crocks have a tightly woven, almost completely unmodifiable structure. See kluge, brittle. The adjectives "crockish" and "crocky", and the nouns "crockishness" and "crockitude", are also used.
[Jargon File]
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
So not only does this utility greatly benefit from solar power but now want to
  fine them is a crock.
To say that solar is a bad idea because it reflects energy is a crock.
The valuations for these social networking sites are all a crock.
Bring along a crock pot if you are traveling by car.
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