crossover

[kraws-oh-ver, kros-]
noun
1.
a bridge or other structure for crossing over a river, highway, etc.
2.
Genetics.
b.
a genotype resulting from crossing over.
3.
Popular Music.
a.
the act of crossing over in style, usually with the intention of broadening the commercial appeal to a wider audience.
b.
music that crosses over in style, occasionally sharing attributes with several musical styles and therefore often appealing to a broader audience.
4.
Also called crossover voter. U.S. politics. a member of one political party who votes for the candidate of another party in a primary.
6.
Railroads. a track structure composed of two or more turnouts, permitting movement of cars from either of two parallel and adjacent tracks to the other.
7.
Dance.
a.
a step in which dancers exchange places.
b.
a step involving partners in which the woman moves from one side of her partner to the other, crossing in front of him.
8.
Bowling. a ball that strikes the side of the head pin opposite to the bowling hand of the bowler.
9.
(in plumbing) a U -shaped pipe for bypassing another pipe.

Origin:
1785–95; noun use of verb phrase cross over

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
crossover (ˈkrɒsˌəʊvə)
 
n
1.  a place at which a crossing is made
2.  genetics
 a.  another term for crossing over
 b.  a chromosomal structure or character resulting from crossing over
3.  railways a point of transfer between two main lines
4.  short for crossover network
5.  a recording, book, or other product that becomes popular in a genre other than its own
 
adj
6.  (of music, fashion, art, etc) combining two distinct styles
7.  (of a performer, writer, recording, book, etc) having become popular in more than one genre

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

crossover
1795, as a term in textiles, from cross (adj.) + over. General use is from 1893; specifically of musicians and genres from 1970s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The movie, whose trailer went viral, marked the final stage of snowboarding's crossover into the mainstream.
Is there a crossover point in the near future of any of these countries.
Often, different lab facilities had to be built to avoid any potential crossover of funds.
Viewed in the larger context of pop culture, the no-crossover argument seems downright archaic.
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