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crouch

[krouch] /kraʊtʃ/
verb (used without object)
1.
to stoop or bend low.
2.
to bend close to the ground, as an animal preparing to spring or shrinking with fear.
3.
to bow or stoop servilely; cringe.
verb (used with object)
4.
to bend low.
noun
5.
the act of crouching.
Origin of crouch
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English crouchen, perhaps blend of couchen to lie down (see couch) and croken to crook1
Related forms
croucher, noun
crouchingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for crouch
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The madman darted forward in a crouch to retrieve his dagger, and as he did so Simon kicked him in the chin.

  • The birds, the insects even, all life seemed to crouch, hushed and expectant.

    The Golden Woman Ridgwell Cullum
  • With a movement smooth enough not to look rushed I swung into a crouch.

    The Night of the Long Knives Fritz Reuter Leiber
  • Wherever he had elected to crouch and tremble, it was too hazardous to go near him.

  • She made him crouch down in the thicket twenty yards from the fence, but she herself crept forward.

    Lives of the Fur Folk M. D. Haviland
British Dictionary definitions for crouch

crouch

/kraʊtʃ/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to bend low with the limbs pulled up close together, esp (of an animal) in readiness to pounce
2.
(intransitive) to cringe, as in humility or fear
3.
(transitive) to bend (parts of the body), as in humility or fear
noun
4.
the act of stooping or bending
Word Origin
C14: perhaps from Old French crochir to become bent like a hook, from croche hook
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for crouch
v.

late 14c., probably from Old French crochir "become bent, crooked," from croche "hook" (see crochet). Related: Crouched; crouching. As a noun, from 1590s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
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