follow Dictionary.com

It’s about time. We are now on Instagram!

crowbar

[kroh-bahr] /ˈkroʊˌbɑr/
noun
1.
Also called crow. a steel bar, usually flattened and slightly bent at one or both ends, used as a lever.
verb (used with object), crowbarred, crowbarring.
2.
to pry open, loosen, etc., with a crowbar:
We had to crowbar a window to get in.
Origin
1740-1750
1740-50, Americanism; crow1 + bar1; so called because one end was beak-shaped
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for crowbar
  • While bullets ricocheted around them, a gunner improvised a second tourniquet using a crowbar and field dressing.
  • The blaze out, the firemen threw aside their hose and pried open the door with a crowbar.
  • He drops the crowbar that he had slipped from his pants and holds his palms out empty.
  • If the crowbar is easily handled, without feeling heat or discomfort, the hay in that area has not heated yet.
  • The argument escalated to an altercation outside the store when one of the owners struck and killed the deceased with a crowbar.
  • The brake is a bent crowbar, the accelerator handle an old tent pin.
  • The first thing they have the students do is move a two-ton cement block with a six-foot crowbar and a team of five people.
  • When the diverting path is a crowbar-type device, little energy is dissipated in the crowbar, as noted earlier.
  • If your door is stuck down you will have to pry it up with a crowbar.
  • The brothers went to the store, broke in using a crowbar, and stole two to three thousand dollars.
British Dictionary definitions for crowbar

crowbar

/ˈkrəʊˌbɑː/
noun
1.
a heavy iron lever with one pointed end, and one forged into a wedge shape
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for crowbar
n.

1748, with bar (n.1), earlier simply crow (c.1400); so called from its "beak" or from resemblance to a crow's foot; or possibly it is from crows, from Old French cros, plural of croc "hook."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for crowbar

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for crowbar

14
16
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with crowbar

Nearby words for crowbar