Cumberland

Cumberland

[kuhm-ber-luhnd]
noun
1.
a former county in NW England, now part of Cumbria.
2.
a town in N Rhode Island.
3.
a city in NW Maryland, on the Potomac River.
4.
a river flowing W from SE Kentucky through N Tennessee into the Ohio River. 687 miles (1106 km) long.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
Cumberland1 (ˈkʌmbələnd)
 
n
(until 1974) a county of NW England, now part of Cumbria

Cumberland2 (ˈkʌmbələnd)
 
n
1.  Richard. 1631--1718, English theologian and moral philosopher; bishop of Peterborough (1691--1718)
2.  William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, known as Butcher Cumberland. 1721--65, English soldier, younger son of George II, noted for his defeat of Charles Edward Stuart at Culloden (1746) and his subsequent ruthless destruction of Jacobite rebels

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Cumberland
O.E. Cumbra land (945) "region of the Cymry" (see Cymric).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

cumberland

historic county, extreme northwestern England, bounded on the north by Scotland, on the east by the historic counties of Northumberland and Durham, and on the south by the historic counties of Westmorland and Lancashire. Cumberland is presently part of the administrative county of Cumbria.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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