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daemon

[dee-muh n] /ˈdi mən/
noun
1.
Classical Mythology.
  1. a god.
  2. a subordinate deity, as the genius of a place or a person's attendant spirit.
2.
a demon.
Also, daimon.
Origin
< Latin daemōn a spirit, an evil spirit < Greek daímōn a deity, fate, fortune; compare daíesthai to distribute
Related forms
daemonic
[dih-mon-ik] /dɪˈmɒn ɪk/ (Show IPA),
daemonistic
[dee-muh-nis-tik] /ˌdi məˈnɪs tɪk/ (Show IPA),
adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for daemon
  • If the daemon is not running correctly, it will prompt you to start the daemon.
British Dictionary definitions for daemon

daemon

/ˈdiːmən/
noun
1.
a demigod
2.
the guardian spirit of a place or person
3.
a variant spelling of demon (sense 3)
Derived Forms
daemonic (diːˈmɒnɪk) adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for daemon
n.

alternative spelling (in specialized senses) of demon (q.v.). Related: Daemonic.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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daemon in Technology
operating system
/day'mn/ or /dee'mn/ (From the mythological meaning, later rationalised as the acronym "Disk And Execution MONitor") A program that is not invoked explicitly, but lies dormant waiting for some condition(s) to occur. The idea is that the perpetrator of the condition need not be aware that a daemon is lurking (though often a program will commit an action only because it knows that it will implicitly invoke a daemon).
For example, under ITS writing a file on the LPT spooler's directory would invoke the spooling daemon, which would then print the file. The advantage is that programs wanting files printed need neither compete for access to, nor understand any idiosyncrasies of, the LPT. They simply enter their implicit requests and let the daemon decide what to do with them. Daemons are usually spawned automatically by the system, and may either live forever or be regenerated at intervals.
Unix systems run many daemons, chiefly to handle requests for services from other hosts on a network. Most of these are now started as required by a single real daemon, inetd, rather than running continuously. Examples are cron (local timed command execution), rshd (remote command execution), rlogind and telnetd (remote login), ftpd, nfsd (file transfer), lpd (printing).
Daemon and demon are often used interchangeably, but seem to have distinct connotations (see demon). The term "daemon" was introduced to computing by CTSS people (who pronounced it /dee'mon/) and used it to refer to what ITS called a dragon.
[Jargon File]
(1995-05-11)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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daemon in the Bible

the Greek form, rendered "devil" in the Authorized Version of the New Testament. Daemons are spoken of as spiritual beings (Matt. 8:16; 10:1; 12:43-45) at enmity with God, and as having a certain power over man (James 2:19; Rev. 16:14). They recognize our Lord as the Son of God (Matt. 8:20; Luke 4:41). They belong to the number of those angels that "kept not their first estate," "unclean spirits," "fallen angels," the angels of the devil (Matt. 25:41; Rev. 12:7-9). They are the "principalities and powers" against which we must "wrestle" (Eph. 6:12).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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