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dale

[deyl] /deɪl/
noun
1.
a valley, especially a broad valley.
Origin of dale
900
before 900; Middle English dal, Old English dæl; cognate with German Tal, Old Norse dalr, Gothic dals

Dale

[deyl] /deɪl/
noun
1.
Sir Henry Hallett
[hal-it] /ˈhæl ɪt/ (Show IPA),
1875–1968, English physiologist: Nobel Prize in Medicine 1936.
2.
Sir Thomas, died 1619, British colonial administrator in America: governor of Virginia 1614–16.
3.
a male or female given name.

daleth

[dah-luh d, -luh th, -luh t; Sephardic Hebrew dah-let] /ˈdɑ ləd, -ləθ, -lət; Sephardic Hebrew ˈdɑ lɛt/
noun
1.
the fourth letter of the Hebrew alphabet.
2.
the consonant sound represented by this letter.
Also, dalet, dales
[Ashkenazic Hebrew dah-luh s] /Ashkenazic Hebrew ˈdɑ ləs/ (Show IPA)
.
Origin
< Hebrew dāleth, akin to dālāh door
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for dales
Historical Examples
  • The dales were a healthy race, but one or two of the Tredgolds had died of consumption.

    Girls of the Forest L. T. Meade
  • It was three years since I had seen the dales, father and daughter.

    A Virginia Scout Hugh Pendexter
  • There should certainly be hills and dales,—on a small scale; and above all, there should be running water.

    Can You Forgive Her? Anthony Trollope
  • "Steady, Ned, for the good name of the dales," cried a Yorkshireman.

    Sir Nigel Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Gentle hills and dales, shady groves and mossy glens surrounded the house, which was a very good one.

    Johnny Ludlow, Sixth Series Mrs. Henry Wood
  • For, miss, the history of the dales is almost bound up with the history of the Kings.

    Girls of the Forest L. T. Meade
  • Over it all lies that haze of luminous gold that the sunshine gives to these dales.

    Motor tours in Yorkshire Mrs. Rodolph Stawell
  • If there is a family on this earth that I have been proud to have to do with, it is that of the dales.

    Girls of the Forest L. T. Meade
  • In that rocky mountain you will find three dales, one of which is very deep, those are the dints made by your hammer.

  • She had been born and bred in this land of the dales and fells, under the shadow of Thundergay.

    Barbara Lynn Emily J. Jenkinson
British Dictionary definitions for dales

Dales1

/deɪlz/
plural noun
1.
(sometimes not capital) the Dales, short for the Yorkshire Dales

Dales2

/deɪlz/
noun
1.
a strong working breed of pony, originating from Yorkshire and Durham

dale

/deɪl/
noun
1.
an open valley, usually in an area of low hills
Word Origin
Old English dæl; related to Old Frisian del, Old Norse dalr, Old High German tal valley

Dale

/deɪl/
noun
1.
Sir Henry Hallet. 1875–1968, English physiologist: shared a Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1936 with Otto Loewi for their work on the chemical transmission of nerve impulses

daleth

/ˈdɑːlɪd; Hebrew ˈdalɛt/
noun
1.
the fourth letter of the Hebrew alphabet (ד), transliterated as d or, when final, dh
Word Origin
Hebrew
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dales

dale

n.

Old English dæl "dale, valley, gorge," from Proto-Germanic *dalan "valley" (cf. Old Saxon, Dutch, Gothic dal, Old Norse dalr, Old High German tal, German Tal "valley"), from PIE *dhel- "a hollow" (cf. Old Church Slavonic dolu "pit," Russian dol "valley"). Preserved from extinction by Norse influence in north of England.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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dales in Medicine

Dale (dāl), Sir Henry Hallett. 1875-1968.

British physiologist. He shared a 1936 Nobel Prize for work on the chemical transmission of nerve impulses, particularly for the isolation and study of acetylcholine (1914).

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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dales in Science
Dale
  (dāl)   
British physiologist who discovered acetylcholine and, with Otto Loewi, investigated the chemical transmission of nerve impulses. For this work they shared the 1936 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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6
7
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