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dance

[dans, dahns] /dæns, dɑns/
verb (used without object), danced, dancing.
1.
to move one's feet or body, or both, rhythmically in a pattern of steps, especially to the accompaniment of music.
2.
to leap, skip, etc., as from excitement or emotion; move nimbly or quickly:
to dance with joy.
3.
to bob up and down:
The toy sailboats danced on the pond.
verb (used with object), danced, dancing.
4.
to perform or take part in (a dance):
to dance a waltz.
5.
to cause to dance:
He danced her around the ballroom.
6.
to cause to be in a specified condition by dancing:
She danced her way to stardom.
noun
7.
a successive group of rhythmical steps or bodily motions, or both, usually executed to music.
8.
an act or round of dancing; set:
May I have this dance?
9.
the art of dancing:
to study dance.
10.
a social gathering or party for dancing; ball:
Was he invited to the dance?
11.
a piece of music suited in rhythm or style to a particular form of dancing:
He liked the composer's country dances.
12.
Animal Behavior. a stylized pattern of movements performed by an animal, as a bird in courtship display, or an insect, as a honeybee in indicating a source of nectar.
13.
the dance, ballet, interpretive dancing, and other dancing of an artistic nature performed by professional dancers before an audience.
Idioms
14.
dance attendance. attendance (def 4).
15.
dance on air, Slang. to be hanged.
16.
dance to another tune, to change one's behavior, attitudes, etc.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; (v.) Middle English da(u)ncen < Anglo-French dancer, dauncer, Old French dancier, perhaps < Old High German *dansjan to lead (someone) to a dance; (noun) Middle English da(u)nce < Anglo-French; Old French dance, derivative of dancier
Related forms
dancingly, adverb
antidancing, adjective
outdance, verb (used with object), outdanced, outdancing.
undancing, adjective
well-danced, adjective
Synonyms
2. cavort, caper, frolic, gambol, prance.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for dance
  • And it goes with dance moves that involve-you guessed it-moving to the left.
  • We can also feel the urge and pattern of a dance without moving a muscle.
  • It started in music with hip hop samples and extended dance versions.
  • Music is known to induce terror and tears, as well as inspire dance.
  • For instance: cranking out full-body dance routines, or using your arms, legs and head to plug holes in a leaky submarine.
  • Full of soul, it's the kind of music you gotta dance to-unless there's something wrong with you.
  • From ballet to break-dance, this country stays moving on the dance floor.
  • We listen to music, dance to rhythms and play sports without regard to country of origin.
  • Loves to go see family back home, will do his little happy feet dance when he sees them.
  • For half an hour they sit quietly and watch the party, then rise for their first dance, again surrounded by candles.
British Dictionary definitions for dance

dance

/dɑːns/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to move the feet and body rhythmically, esp in time to music
2.
(transitive) to perform (a particular dance)
3.
(intransitive) to skip or leap, as in joy, etc
4.
to move or cause to move in a light rhythmic way
5.
dance attendance on someone, to attend someone solicitously or obsequiously
noun
6.
a series of rhythmic steps and movements, usually in time to music related adjective Terpsichorean
7.
an act of dancing
8.
  1. a social meeting arranged for dancing; ball
  2. (as modifier) a dance hall
9.
a piece of music in the rhythm of a particular dance form, such as a waltz
10.
short for dance music (sense 2)
11.
dancelike movements made by some insects and birds, esp as part of a behaviour pattern
12.
(Brit, informal) lead someone a dance, to cause someone continued worry and exasperation; play up
Derived Forms
danceable, adjective
dancer, noun
dancing, noun, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French dancier
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dance
dance
c.1300, from O.Fr. dancier, perhaps from Frankish. A word of uncertain origin but which, through French influence in arts and society, has become the primary word for this activity from Spain to Russia. Replaced O.E. sealtian. Related: Dancer (mid-15c.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for dance

dance

noun

A fight between rival gangs; rumble: The kids have plenty of time for pushing a dance (1940s+ Street gang)

Related Terms

get the last dance, go into one's dance, song and dance, tap dance


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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dance in the Bible

found in Judg. 21:21, 23; Ps. 30:11; 149:3; 150:4; Jer. 31:4, 13, etc., as the translation of _hul_, which points to the whirling motion of Oriental sacred dances. It is the rendering of a word (rakad') which means to skip or leap for joy, in Eccl. 3:4; Job 21:11; Isa. 13:21, etc. In the New Testament it is in like manner the translation of different Greek words, circular motion (Luke 15:25); leaping up and down in concert (Matt. 11:17), and by a single person (Matt. 14:6). It is spoken of as symbolical of rejoicing (Eccl. 3:4. Comp. Ps. 30:11; Matt. 11: 17). The Hebrews had their sacred dances expressive of joy and thanksgiving, when the performers were usually females (Ex. 15:20; 1 Sam. 18:6). The ancient dance was very different from that common among Western nations. It was usually the part of the women only (Ex. 15:20; Judg. 11:34; comp. 5:1). Hence the peculiarity of David's conduct in dancing before the ark of the Lord (2 Sam. 6:14). The women took part in it with their timbrels. Michal should, in accordance with the example of Miriam and others, have herself led the female choir, instead of keeping aloof on the occasion and "looking through the window." David led the choir "uncovered", i.e., wearing only the ephod or linen tunic. He thought only of the honour of God, and forgot himself. From being reserved for occasions of religious worship and festivity, it came gradually to be practised in common life on occasions of rejoicing (Jer. 31:4). The sexes among the Jews always danced separately. The daughter of Herodias danced alone (Matt. 14:6).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Idioms and Phrases with dance
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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