debility

[dih-bil-i-tee]
noun, plural debilities.
1.
a weakened or enfeebled state; weakness: Debility prevented him from getting out of bed.
2.
a particular mental or physical handicap; disability.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English debylite < Middle French debilite < Latin dēbilitās, equivalent to dēbil(is) weak + -itās -ity

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Collins
World English Dictionary
debility (dɪˈbɪlɪtɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
weakness or infirmity

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

debility
late 15c., from M.Fr. debilite, from L. debilitatem (nom. debilitas), from debilis "weak," from de- "from, away" + -bilis "strength," from PIE base *bel- (see Bolshevik).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

debility de·bil·i·ty (dĭ-bĭl'ĭ-tē)
n.
The state of being weak or feeble; infirmity.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
We experience lives of debility and calamity as a result of negative karma.
We learn also how he was prone to illness, but conquered his debility.
He suffered from pallor and debility thirty-five hundred years ago.
There is a line to be drawn between any insights from sadness and the debility of a clinical condition.
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