debrief

[dee-breef]
verb (used with object)
1.
to interrogate (a soldier, astronaut, diplomat, etc.) on return from a mission in order to assess the conduct and results of the mission.
2.
to question formally and systematically in order to obtain useful intelligence or information: Political and economic experts routinely debrief important defectors about conditions in their home country.
3.
to subject to prohibitions against revealing or discussing classified information, as upon separation from a position of military or political sensitivity.
4.
Psychology. (after an experiment) to disclose to the subject the purpose of the experiment and any reasons for deception or manipulation.

Origin:
1940–45; de- + brief

debriefer, noun
debriefing, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
debrief (diːˈbriːf)
 
vb
Compare brief (of a soldier, astronaut, diplomat, etc) to make or (of his superiors) to elicit a report after a mission or event
 
de'briefing
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

debrief
"obtain information (from someone) at the end of a mission," 1945, from de- + brief (v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Agents gather intelligence, evidence and information to interrogate and debrief.
Afterwards, debrief the process, starting with feedback from the judge.
The house was normally used to debrief or entertain defectors.
They would debrief the prisoner on his interrogation sessions.
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