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[dih-sep-shuh n] /dɪˈsɛp ʃən/
the act of deceiving; the state of being deceived.
something that deceives or is intended to deceive; fraud; artifice.
Origin of deception
late Middle English
1400-50; late Middle English decepcioun < Old French < Late Latin dēceptiōn- (stem of dēceptiō), equivalent to Latin dēcept(us) (past participle of dēcipere; see deceive) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
nondeception, noun
predeception, noun
2. trick, stratagem, ruse, wile, hoax, imposture. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for deception
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • A great portion of his strength lay in his capacity for deception.

    The Child of Pleasure Gabriele D'Annunzio
  • But everything savoring of deception was universally condemned.

    Mizora: A Prophecy Mary E. Bradley
  • The false display at Dublin was a deception both to the king and to the Irish.

    Irish Nationality Alice Stopford Green
  • You acknowledge the deception, and we will let the farce end here.

    In School and Out Oliver Optic
  • Of course, after the deception was begun, she wouldn't betray me.

    The Road to Paris Robert Neilson Stephens
British Dictionary definitions for deception


the act of deceiving or the state of being deceived
something that deceives; trick
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for deception

early 15c., from Middle French déception (13c., decepcion) or directly from Late Latin deceptionem (nominative deceptio) "a deceiving," from Latin decept-, past participle stem of decipere (see deceive).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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