deceptive

[dih-sep-tiv]
adjective
1.
apt or tending to deceive: The enemy's peaceful overtures may be deceptive.
2.
perceptually misleading: It looks like a curved line, but it's deceptive.

Origin:
1605–15; < Medieval Latin dēceptīvus, equivalent to Latin dēcept(us) (see deception) + -īvus -ive

deceptively, adverb
deceptiveness, noun
nondeceptive, adjective
nondeceptively, adverb
nondeceptiveness, noun
undeceptive, adjective
undeceptively, adverb
undeceptiveness, noun


1. delusive, fallacious, specious.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
deceptive (dɪˈsɛptɪv)
 
adj
1.  likely or designed to deceive; misleading: appearances can be deceptive
2.  music (of a cadence) another word for interrupted
 
de'ceptively
 
adv
 
de'ceptiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

deceptive
1610s, from Fr. deceptif (late 14c.), from M.L. deceptivus, from decept-, pp. stem of L. decipere (see deceive). Earlier in this sense was deceptious (c.1600), from Fr. deceptieux, from M.L. deceptiosus, from deceptionem. Related: Deceptively (1825).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Something deceptively similar happens in the ranking of citations.
It is all good fun, yet among the anecdotes and curious facts the science
  content is deceptively high.
Resembling a sunflower, a sea anemone appears deceptively benign.
The concept of handedness-of left and right, say, or of clockwise and
  anti-clockwise-is deceptively simple.
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