deference

[def-er-uhns]
noun
1.
respectful submission or yielding to the judgment, opinion, will, etc., of another.
2.
respectful or courteous regard: in deference to his wishes.

Origin:
1640–50; < French déférence, Middle French, equivalent to defer(er) to defer2 + -ence -ence

nondeference, noun
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World English Dictionary
deference (ˈdɛfərəns)
 
n
1.  submission to or compliance with the will, wishes, etc, of another
2.  courteous regard; respect
 
[C17: from French déférence; see defer²]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

deference
1640s, from Fr. déférence (16c.), from déférer (see defer (2)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He responded with courtly deference, giving them his full attention.
Deference and obedience to one's elders are of the utmost importance, as are
  ideas of hospitality and social ties.
His record on the bench is one of cautious rulings and scrupulous deference to
  precedent.
The traditional family crumbled, along with old-fashioned notions of deference.
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