deliberation

[dih-lib-uh-rey-shuhn]
noun
1.
careful consideration before decision.
2.
formal consultation or discussion.
3.
deliberate quality; leisureliness of movement or action; slowness.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English deliberacion < Latin dēlīberātiōn- (stem of dēlīberātiō), equivalent to dēlīberāt(us) (see deliberate) + -iōn- -ion

nondeliberation, noun
overdeliberation, noun
predeliberation, noun
redeliberation, noun


1. reflection, forethought.
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World English Dictionary
deliberation (dɪˌlɪbəˈreɪʃən)
 
n
1.  thoughtful, careful, or lengthy consideration
2.  (often plural) formal discussion and debate, as of a committee, jury, etc
3.  care, thoughtfulness, or absence of hurry, esp in movement or speech

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

deliberation
late 14c., from L. deliberationem, from deliberare "weigh, consider well," from de- "entirely" + -liberare, altered (perhaps by influence of liberare "liberate") from librare "to balance, weigh," from libra "scale."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
University lawyers often bump up against an athletics world where speed and
  money trump legal deliberation.
The facts of the case were disputed and required jury deliberation.
Members say that deliberation is necessary because the group must come to a
  consensus.
Editors have been rightly wary of sacrificing accuracy and deliberation to the
  instantaneous buzz of cyberspace.
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