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[dih-prahyv] /dɪˈpraɪv/
verb (used with object), deprived, depriving.
to remove or withhold something from the enjoyment or possession of (a person or persons):
to deprive a man of life; to deprive a baby of candy.
to remove from ecclesiastical office.
Origin of deprive
1275-1325; Middle English depriven < Anglo-French, Old French depriver < Medieval Latin dēprīvāre, equivalent to Latin dē- de- + prīvāre to deprive (prīv(us) private + -āre infinitive suffix)
Related forms
deprivable, adjective
deprival, noun
[dih-priv-uh-tiv] /dɪˈprɪv ə tɪv/ (Show IPA),
depriver, noun
nondeprivable, adjective
predeprive, verb (used with object), predeprived, predepriving.
self-depriving, adjective
1. See strip1 . Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for deprive
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • To deprive of commission, warrant, or rating, by court-martial.

    The Sailor's Word-Book William Henry Smyth
  • The joy is not to deprive the heaviness of its weight, nor the sorrow of its sting.

    Expositions of Holy Scripture Alexander Maclaren
  • Among other repressive measures he was instructed to deprive mere housekeepers of the suffrage and limit it to freeholders.

    Give Me Liberty Thomas J. Wertenbaker
  • From one point of view it is easy to cheat society, and deprive it of its due.

    Practical Ethics William DeWitt Hyde
  • Yes, the voice was the same she had heard that evening, weeks before, plotting to deprive them of their home.

British Dictionary definitions for deprive


verb (transitive)
(foll by of) to prevent from possessing or enjoying; dispossess (of)
(archaic) to remove from rank or office; depose; demote
Derived Forms
deprivable, adjective
deprival, noun
depriver, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French depriver, from Medieval Latin dēprīvāre, from Latin de- + prīvāre to deprive of, rob; see private
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for deprive

mid-14c., from Old French depriver, from Medieval Latin deprivare, from Latin de- "entirely" (see de-) + privare "release from" (see private). Replaced Old English bedælan. Related: Deprived; depriving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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deprive in Medicine

deprive de·prive (dĭ-prīv')
v. de·prived, de·priv·ing, de·prives

  1. To take something from someone or something.

  2. To keep from possessing or enjoying something.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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