depth of field

noun Optics, Photography.
the range of distances along the axis of an optical instrument, usually a camera lens, through which an object will produce a relatively distinct image.
Also called depth of focus.


Origin:
1910–15

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World English Dictionary
depth of field
 
n
Compare depth of focus the range of distance in front of and behind an object focused by an optical instrument, such as a camera or microscope, within which other objects will also appear clear and sharply defined in the resulting image

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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  depth of field
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  the distance between the nearest and furthest objects in focus as seen by a camera lens, which varies with the focal length of the lens, its f-stop setting, and wavelength of light
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Example sentences
There also appears to be something in the depth of field that does not seem
  right.
The biggest difference of all is in the depth of field.
Focus is key in successful macro photography, in which a shallow depth of field
  is inherent.
Automatic focus in low light settings can be tricky, so focus manually and use
  a high f-stop to get good depth of field.
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