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deride

[dih-rahyd] /dɪˈraɪd/
verb (used with object), derided, deriding.
1.
to laugh at in scorn or contempt; scoff or jeer at; mock.
Origin
1520-1530
1520-30; < Latin dērīdēre to mock, equivalent to dē- de- + rīdēre to laugh
Related forms
derider, noun
deridingly, adverb
overderide, verb (used with object), overderided, overderiding.
underided, adjective
Synonyms
taunt, flout, gibe, banter, rally. See ridicule.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for deride
  • In one breath you deride moral decay, but in the next you highlight the worst in our society.
  • Politicians like to deride expensive programmes.
  • Any flagrant acts or remarks that deride, mock, bait or embarrass an opponent are considered taunting.
  • Fooling yourself into feeling better about life is easy to deride.
  • Critics deride such content as corny or predictable.
  • Some may deride baseball for being too slow in such modern times.
  • It is tempting to deride the bull market of the '20s as a case study in mass delusion.
  • Populist critics deride this train of logic as “trickle-down economics.” But it is more accurate to call it textbook economics.
  • At the rally, plenty of T-shirts will deride motorcycle helmet laws.
  • Traditional forms of communication, which some may deride as old-fashioned, will always play a central role in politics.
British Dictionary definitions for deride

deride

/dɪˈraɪd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to speak of or treat with contempt, mockery, or ridicule; scoff or jeer at
Derived Forms
derider, noun
deridingly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin dērīdēre to laugh to scorn, from de- + rīdēre to laugh, smile
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for deride
v.

1520s, from Middle French derider, from Latin deridere "to ridicule, laugh to scorn" (see derision). Related: Derided; deriding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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