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derisive

[dih-rahy-siv, -ris-iv] /dɪˈraɪ sɪv, -ˈrɪs ɪv/
adjective
1.
characterized by or expressing derision; contemptuous; mocking:
derisive heckling.
Also, derisory
[dih-rahy-suh-ree, -zuh-] /dɪˈraɪ sə ri, -zə-/ (Show IPA)
.
Origin
1655-1665
1655-65; deris(ion) + -ive
Related forms
derisively, adverb
derisiveness, noun
nonderisive, adjective
overderisive, adjective
overderisively, adverb
overderisiveness, noun
underisive, adjective
underisively, adverb
underisiveness, noun
underisory, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for derisory
  • So the dean made a derisory counter offer calculating, correctly, that he would not move.
  • Most private sector pension schemes are producing derisory benefits by past standards.
British Dictionary definitions for derisory

derisory

/dɪˈraɪsərɪ; -zərɪ/
adjective
1.
subject to or worthy of derision, esp because of being ridiculously small or inadequate
2.
another word for derisive

derisive

/dɪˈraɪsɪv; -zɪv/
adjective
1.
showing or characterized by derision; mocking; scornful
Derived Forms
derisively, adverb
derisiveness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for derisory
derisive
1620s, "characterized by derision," from L. deris-, pp. stem of deridere (see derision) + -ive. Meaning "ridiculous" is from 1896. Related: Derisively.
derisory
1610s, from L. derisorius, from derisor "derider," agent noun from deridere (see deride).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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