detain

[dih-teyn]
verb (used with object)
1.
to keep from proceeding; keep waiting; delay.
2.
to keep under restraint or in custody.
3.
Obsolete. to keep back or withhold, as from a person.

Origin:
1480–90; detainen < Anglo-French, Old French detenir < Vulgar Latin *dētenīre, for Latin dētinēre, equivalent to dē- de- + -tinēre, combining form of tenēre to hold

detainable, adjective
detainment, noun
predetain, verb (used with object)
undetainable, adjective
undetained, adjective


1. retard, stop, slow, stay, check.
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World English Dictionary
detain (dɪˈteɪn)
 
vb
1.  to delay; hold back; stop
2.  to confine or hold in custody; restrain
3.  archaic to retain or withhold
 
[C15: from Old French detenir, from Latin dētinēre to hold off, keep back, from de- + tenēre to hold]
 
de'tainable
 
adj
 
detainee
 
n
 
de'tainment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

detain
mid-15c., from M.Fr. detenir, from O.Fr. detenir "to hold off, keep back" (12c.), from L. detinere "hold off, keep back," from de- "from, away" + tenere "to hold" (see tenet). Related: Detainee (1928).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The prisoners who were detained with me were intellectuals.
When he's detained at the border, panic gets the best of him.
He showed decided disappointment at the prospect of being detained.
Chapman and his companions were committed to prison, though they do not seem to
  have been detained long.
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