follow Dictionary.com

Dictionary.com's Word of the Year is...

detriment

[de-truh-muh nt] /ˈdɛ trə mənt/
noun
1.
loss, damage, disadvantage, or injury.
2.
a cause of loss or damage.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin dētrīmentum loss, damage, equivalent to dētrī- (see detritus) + -mentum -ment
Synonyms
1. See damage.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for detriment
  • Let us just say that everything that they tout as an "improvement" is a detriment to the actual functioning of the product.
  • It is to the detriment of that country.
  • We hope the Norwalk hatters stay at work, but not to the detriment of the hat industry.
  • Regarding egos, most egos are neutral, but of course a person's ego can be to his detriment.
  • Even a short-term drop in production could be a long-term detriment.
  • Today it serves neither and is actually working to the detriment of both.
  • He was commanded to take care that the republic suffer no detriment.
  • Tradewise, therefore, anything said to its detriment at the moment doesn't mean very much.
  • Interestingly, these are preventive measure that the dental profession has pushed to its own economic detriment.
  • That will be to their detriment.
British Dictionary definitions for detriment

detriment

/ˈdɛtrɪmənt/
noun
1.
disadvantage or damage; harm; loss
2.
a cause of disadvantage or damage
Word Origin
C15: from Latin dētrīmentum, a rubbing off, hence damage, from dēterere to rub away, from de- + terere to rub
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for detriment
n.

early 15c., from Middle French détriment or directly from Latin detrimentum "a rubbing off; a loss, damage, defeat," from past participle stem of detere "to wear away," figuratively "to weaken, impair," from de- "away" (see de-) + terere "to rub, wear" (see throw (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for detriment

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for detriment

12
14
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with detriment

Nearby words for detriment