follow Dictionary.com

Stories We Like: Novels For Language Lovers

devise

[dih-vahyz] /dɪˈvaɪz/
verb (used with object), devised, devising.
1.
to contrive, plan, or elaborate; invent from existing principles or ideas:
to devise a method.
2.
Law. to assign or transmit (property) by will.
3.
Archaic. to imagine; suppose.
verb (used without object), devised, devising.
4.
to form a plan; contrive.
noun
5.
Law.
  1. the act of disposing of property, especially real property, by will.
  2. a will or clause in a will disposing of property, especially real property.
  3. the property so disposed of.
Origin
1150-1200
1150-1200; (v.) Middle English devisen to inspect, design, compose < Old French deviser < Vulgar Latin *dēvīsāre, for *dīvīsāre, frequentative of Latin dīvidere to divide; (noun) see device
Related forms
deviser, noun
predevise, verb (used with object), predevised, predevising.
self-devised, adjective
undevised, adjective
well-devised, adjective
Can be confused
device, devise.
Synonyms
1. See prepare.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for devise
  • devise any security system, and you'll also be able to devise a way around it.
  • This now translates to additional days to devise new rigging for safe deployment.
  • The Regents appointed me in 1994 to address then present problems and to devise and implement new initiatives.
  • Probably the most useful mnemonics are those that people devise for themselves.
  • If we are strong, we shall have allies, and we may be able to devise a way to deter an aggressor.
  • If a restaurant is too busy to have the waiter help deliver plates, it should devise a system to ensure seamless service.
  • He must devise a way to free himself or die.
  • Try to devise some alternatives.
  • The challenge has been to devise algorithms that can interpret such numbers as scenes composed of different objects in space.
  • The rating agencies made public computer models that were used to devise ratings to make the process less secretive.
British Dictionary definitions for devise

devise

/dɪˈvaɪz/
verb
1.
to work out, contrive, or plan (something) in one's mind
2.
(transitive) (law) to dispose of (property, esp real property) by will
3.
(transitive) (obsolete) to imagine or guess
noun (law)
4.
  1. a disposition of property by will
  2. the property so transmitted Compare bequeath (sense 1)
5.
a will or clause in a will disposing of real property Compare bequest (sense 2)
Derived Forms
deviser, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Old French deviser to divide, apportion, intend, from Latin dīvidere to divide
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for devise
v.

early 13c., "to form, fashion;" c.1300, "to plan, contrive," from Old French deviser "dispose in portions, arrange, plan, contrive" (in modern French, "to chat, gossip"), from Vulgar Latin *divisare, frequentative of Latin dividere "to divide" (see divide). Modern sense is from "to arrange a division" (especially via a will), a meaning present in the Old French word. Related: Devised; devising.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source