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diabetes

[dahy-uh-bee-tis, -teez] /ˌdaɪ əˈbi tɪs, -tiz/
noun, Pathology
1.
any of several disorders characterized by increased urine production.
2.
Also called diabetes mellitus
[mel-i-tuh s, muh-lahy-] /ˈmɛl ɪ təs, məˈlaɪ-/ (Show IPA)
. a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, usually occurring in genetically predisposed individuals, characterized by inadequate production or utilization of insulin and resulting in excessive amounts of glucose in the blood and urine, excessive thirst, weight loss, and in some cases progressive destruction of small blood vessels leading to such complications as infections and gangrene of the limbs or blindness.
3.
Also called type 1 diabetes, insulin-dependent diabetes, juvenile diabetes. a severe form of diabetes mellitus in which insulin production by the beta cells of the pancreas is impaired, usually resulting in dependence on externally administered insulin, the onset of the disease typically occurring before the age of 25.
4.
Also called type 2 diabetes, non-insulin-dependent diabetes, adult-onset diabetes, maturity-onset diabetes. a mild, sometimes asymptomatic form of diabetes mellitus characterized by diminished tissue sensitivity to insulin and sometimes by impaired beta cell function, exacerbated by obesity and often treatable by diet and exercise.
5.
Also called diabetes insipidus
[in-sip-i-duh s] /ɪnˈsɪp ɪ dəs/ (Show IPA)
. increased urine production caused by inadequate secretion of vasopressin by the pituary gland.
Origin
1555-1565
1555-65; < Neo-Latin, Latin < Greek, equivalent to diabē- (variant stem of diabaínein to go through, pass over, equivalent to dia- dia- + baínein to pass) + -tēs agent suffix
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for diabetes
  • Experience with community based translational research in obesity and diabetes prevention is preferred.
  • People living with diabetes who inject insulin are not covered by the recommendations in this guidance.
  • Embryonic stem cells may someday help doctors treat ills ranging from paralysis to diabetes.
  • He died of complications from diabetes the following year.
  • Researchers announce a key development in the search for a diabetes cure.
  • If you have diabetes you are more likely to have foot problems.
  • The sweet smell of rotten apples, for instance, indicates diabetes.
  • His company hopes to begin a similar human study for treating diabetes in a few years.
  • In people with diabetes these cells have stopped working properly.
  • There is evidence that anthocyanins also have anti-inflammatory activity, promote visual acuity, and hinder obesity and diabetes.
British Dictionary definitions for diabetes

diabetes

/ˌdaɪəˈbiːtɪs; -tiːz/
noun
1.
any of various disorders, esp diabetes mellitus, characterized by excretion of an abnormally large amount of urine
Word Origin
C16: from Latin: siphon, from Greek, literally: a passing through (referring to the excessive urination), from diabainein to pass through, cross over; see diabase
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for diabetes
n.

1560s, from medical Latin diabetes, from late Greek diabetes "excessive discharge of urine" (so named by Aretaeus the Cappadocian, physician of Alexandria, 2c.), literally "a passer-through, siphon," from diabainein "to pass through," from dia- "through" (see dia-) + bainein "to go" (see come).

An old common native name for it was pissing evil. In classical Greek, diabainein meant "to stand or walk with the legs apart," and diabetes meant "a drafting compass," from the position of the legs.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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diabetes in Medicine

diabetes di·a·be·tes (dī'ə-bē'tĭs, -tēz)
n.
Any of several metabolic disorders marked by excessive discharge of urine and persistent thirst, especially one of the two types of diabetes mellitus.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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