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diary

[dahy-uh-ree] /ˈdaɪ ə ri/
noun, plural diaries.
1.
a daily record, usually private, especially of the writer's own experiences, observations, feelings, attitudes, etc.
2.
a book for keeping such a record.
3.
a book or pad containing pages marked and arranged in calendar order, in which to note appointments and the like.
Origin of diary
1575-1585
1575-85; < Latin diārium daily allowance, journal, equivalent to di(ēs) day + -ārium -ary
Can be confused
dairy, diary.
Synonyms
1, 2. journal, daybook, log, chronicle.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for diary
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The idea that has borne fruit was this: During the period of his service in the war he had kept a diary.

    Sword and Pen John Algernon Owens
  • On the 9th Nelson sent Collingwood what he called, in his diary, the Nelson-touch.

  • Of course they did discover it, and went to bed giggling; but as they kept no diary the world never learned it.

    London Walter Besant
  • That page in her diary called out to her to come home and burn it.

  • Mr. Brunel thus refers to it in his diary:—Got through it very tolerably, which I consider great things.

British Dictionary definitions for diary

diary

/ˈdaɪərɪ/
noun (pl) -ries
1.
a personal record of daily events, appointments, observations, etc
2.
a book for keeping such a record
Word Origin
C16: from Latin diārium daily allocation of food or money, journal, from diēs day
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for diary
n.

1580s, from Latin diarium "daily allowance," later "a journal," neuter of diarius "daily," from dies "day" (see diurnal); also see -ary. Earliest sense was a daily record of events; sense of the book in which such are written is said to be first attested in Ben Jonson's "Volpone" (1605).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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